Adjective Phrase

By | April 13, 2019

Adjective Phrase

Adjective Phrase

Adjective Phrase

Most people know what an adjective is, but when it comes to describing an adjective phrase, it’s easy to get confused. An adjective phrase, or an adjectival phrase, is more than a group of words with an adjective in it. It’s actually a group of words that describe a noun or pronoun in a sentence, thus functioning as an adjective.

The good news is, you don’t have to be a grammar buff to understand what an adjective phrase is or how it works. In fact, we use these phrases all the time without even thinking. Let’s take a closer look.

How Can I Identify an Adjective Phrase?

The trick to identifying an adjective phrase is to look at the first word within the group of words. If the first word is an adverb or a preposition, there’s a good chance you’re looking at an adjective phrase.

Ask yourself, what is this phrase modifying? Is it describing a noun? If it is, in fact, modifying the noun or subject of a sentence, then you’re looking at an adjective phrase.

 An

adjective phrase (or adjectival phrase) is a group of words, whose head word is an adjective. It modifies or describes a noun or pronoun. The adjective phrase can be an attributive adjective coming before a noun or a predicative adjective coming after the noun that it modifies in a sentence. As a predicate adjective, it follows a verb or linking verb after the noun or the subject.

Examples:
  • The hotel restaurant serves really delicious meals. (Attributive adjective phrase)
  • The air was filled with the fresh scent of flowers. (Predicative adjective phrase)
  • Everyone knows she is angry with you. (Predicative adjective phrase modifies pronoun.)
  • The sky is cloudy. (Predicate adjective cloudy follows the linking verb is after the noun/subject sky.)
  • An adjective phrase may be preceded by a determiner or a modifier..
  • Everyone knows she is very angry with you. (Adjective phrase modified by very.)